Tiny Chicken Eggs – A Natural Phenomenon With A Spooky History

Regular Size Eggs and A Small Egg Called A 'Cock Egg'

Regular Size Eggs and A Small Egg Called A ‘Cock Egg’, ‘Witch Egg’ or ‘Wind Egg’

I went to collect eggs yesterday and found a dwarf egg sitting in the nest boxes along with the regular size eggs.
I thought to throw it over the house but instead decided to tempt Fate and brought it indoors so I could take a picture of it to share with you.


Tiny or miniature size eggs in standard size hens are the natural result when a small bit of reproductive tissue or other small foreign mass enters the hen’s oviduct and triggers the regular formation of an egg.
Inside the hen’s body the bit of tissue is treated exactly like a normal yolk and is swathed and enveloped in albumen, membranes and a shell and is eventually passed from the hen’s body. When it is laid it looks just like a regular chicken egg except that it is very little and teeny.

These types of malformed eggs have been known for centuries as a ‘Cock Egg’. Most often these little eggs contain only the white of the egg and no yolk. Usually the shells are harder to break than that of a normal egg.

Cock Egg - No Yolk Just Egg White

Cock Egg – No Yolk Just Egg White

‘Cock Egg’ is a synonymous term for any type of abnormal egg.

Sometimes a normal sized egg is formed without a proper hard shell but with a yolk. That egg too is also known as a cock egg, but is sometimes called a “rubber egg’ or “tube egg” by people not familiar with the history or folklore of eggs.

In folk tradition, a cock egg was understood to have been laid by a rooster or cock and not a hen, and was a cause for concern.
Cock eggs according to different folklore traditions bring bad luck or illness if they are brought into the house. That’s because a cock egg is believed to have malefic and magical powers. They are reputed to be of value to sorcerers and magicians for mixing magical potions and casting spells.
The way the story goes is that if a toad, serpent or witch at the behest of Satan incubates a cock egg, the resulting hatchling will be a cockatrice or a basilisk.  A cockatrice or basilisk is an ancient winged monster with a serpent’s body and a rooster’s head that can kill and destroy by its breath and glance.

During the middle ages it was self-evident to most intelligent people that a cock egg was the work of the devil. Animals as well as people could be in league with Satan, and in 1474 a chicken passing for a rooster in Basle, Switzerland was put on trial and condemned to be burned at the stake for “the heinous and unnatural crime of laying an egg”.  American author and educator, E.V. Walter in his essay – Nature On Trial – The Case Of A Rooster That Laid An Egg , writes, “ the execution took place with as great a solemnity as would have be observed in consigning a heretic to the flames, and was witnessed by an immense crowd of townsmen and peasants.”

A cock egg has also been called a ‘Witch Egg’ since the Middle Ages and a ‘Fairy Egg’ during the mid and late Victorian era. In Scotland and elsewhere in Europe, a cock egg is sometimes also called a ‘Wind Egg’.  In recent times here in the U.S. these types of deformed eggs are sometimes called ‘Fart Eggs’.
I suppose language really does reflect cultural ideals and concerns.

Superstition instructs that the best way to protect against the evil of a cock egg is to throw the malformed egg over the roof of the house and smash it on the other side which of course I didn’t do.

So now I guess we’ll just have to wait and see what happens next. But I’m not too worried – it was worth the photos.

  3 comments for “Tiny Chicken Eggs – A Natural Phenomenon With A Spooky History

  1. tj
    May 10, 2013 at 7:54 pm

    …Ha! And here all along I’ve been saving ‘em in a lil’ antique crock bowl I have atop a cupboard in the kitchen. Huh, that could explain all the bad luck we’ve been having. :o)

    …Great post & info’ – thank you!

    …Peace & blessings.

  2. Cathy Geary
    May 10, 2013 at 8:44 pm

    Interesting – we have had two of these this spring. . . never knew that before. Ooops, one sits on my counter now . . .

  3. Darlene
    May 15, 2013 at 8:24 pm

    I just crack them open add them to a “smallish” egg when baking. No bad luck so far =)

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