Around The Homestead

How To Store Fresh Lemons In A Crock

For long-term storage, fresh lemons keep best in a tightly sealed plastic bag in the refrigerator.
But if you don’t have a refrigerator or space in the fridge is limited, there is a time-tested low tech way to store fresh lemons.


Fresh lemons will store very well for a couple of months by being completely submerged in a ceramic crock of cold water.

Fresh Lemons Stored In A Crock Of Cold Water

Fresh Lemons In A Crock Of Cold Water Will Store For A Couple Of Months

Simply place fresh lemons in a clean ceramic crock and cover them entirely with very cold water.

Set a small plate or water filled plastic bag on top of the lemons to keep them submerged and prevent them from floating. Allow the water to cover the plate. If you use a water filled plastic bag, add more water to weight the bag down if necessary to keep the lemons down in the cold water.

Lemons Held Under Water By Plate

Lemons Held Under Water By Plate

Store the crock in a cool location like an unheated basement or root cellar. Change the water every week or so and you’ll have a supply of fresh juicy lemons whenever you want them.

Wood Paneling Walls

This post is dedicated to all of you who are living with hideous wood paneling walls.
I know what you’re going through and really do understand the misery involved.
While I can’t do anything about your own particular wood paneling hell, I hope you will find a small measure of comfort and hope in what follows below.

This Is The Original Wood Paneling That's In Every Room Of My House Except The New Kitchen

This Is The Original Wood Paneling That’s In Every Room Of My House Except The New Kitchen

It’s a fact.
I really hate cheap wood paneling walls. I mean I absolutely loathe it.

And that’s shame, because for over 25 years I’ve had to live with it in my old farmhouse.
Switching out creepy paneling walls for something more aesthetically appealing wasn’t a priority back when my husband and I first move into our house. Back then we were trying to build fences, outbuildings and infrastructure on our farm. Nasty paneling from 1973 on the walls of our house was the least of our concerns.



Truth be told, I’ve done just about everything a person can do to make truly horrible wood paneling more livable.
I filled in the grooves and painted it white. One room of my house was even sponge painted.
I’ve troweled buckets of drywall mud over the paneling, and then sanded it and faux finished it to look like plaster. The guys at Sherwin Williams told me in 1990 that it couldn’t be done and that the mud would never last or stay on the paneling.
Well I’m here to tell you they were wrong. It’s 25 years later and the mud is still on the paneling.

Drywall Mud Over Wood Paneling

Drywall Mud Over Wood Paneling

In the late 1990s I even wallpapered over the wood paneling with some pretty good results.
And last fall I once again had another go at the paneling. I stenciled some of it.

Red Stencil On White Painted Wood Paneling

Red Stencil On White Painted Wood Paneling

I used two different homemade stencils to freshen up a small bedroom. One stencil was used at the top of the wall and the other was applied in a semi-random fashioned. I used red satin finish latex paint for the stencils.

Taped Stencil

Taped Stencil

The results are pleasing. I feel like I can live with the paneling for a little while longer.

Stencil On Wood Paneling

Stencil On Wood Paneling

Hopefully in the near future, all the wood paneling walls in my house will be removed one room at a time. I think I’m going to do drywall and plank walls in some rooms.

When the paneling is torn out, I want the contractor to put it in a big pile near the garden. I want it burned instead of hauling it away or paying money for a dumpster.
How I look forward to that day!
I can hardly wait to start the fire.

Stenciled Walls

Stenciled Walls